Parents Of Chibok Girls Traumatised - P.M. News

Parents Of Chibok Girls Traumatised

•Martha Mark holds up a photograph of her daughter Monica who is one of the girls kidnapped by Boko Haram

In the file: •Martha Mark holds up a photograph of her daughter Monica who is one of the girls kidnapped by Boko Haram

The three girls who escaped from Boko Haram foot soldiers while being abducted from Government Secondary School, Chibok, Borno State and the parents of the over 234 girls who are still at large are still traumatised.

The parents who spoke at a television programme earlier Tuesday said they are yet to recover from the shock of the abduction of their children and the inability of the government and security agencies to find the girls.

They also expressed shock that some people could say the missing girls saga was politically motivated.

In the file: •Martha Mark holds up a photograph of her daughter Monica who is one of the girls kidnapped by Boko Haram
In the file: •Martha Mark holds up a photograph of her daughter Monica who is one of the girls kidnapped by Boko Haram

Some of the parents of the girls who were guests of the Television Continental (TVC) breakfast show, courtesy of Omoluabi Network, a non-governmental organization, said they have resorted to trusting God for the release of their daughters and relatives.

Ruth Bitrus, mother of Hauwa and Godiya, two of the missing girls, said when she heard that her daughters were missing and after watching the video.

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“God, if it is your will that I will never see my daughters again, prepare a better place for them,” she said hoping that her girls will return to her the same way the other girls escaped.

Another mother, Monica was peeved by insinuations that the abduction of the girls was staged managed for political purposes. The woman, whose daughter Saraya, is still in the Boko Haram camp, noted that the feeling she gets from those insinuations is that “there is nobody that can stand for us, otherwise no one would have contemplated denying that the girls are missing.

“When we heard about this whole thing, we just started fainting,” she said through an interpreter.

Earlier, Kucheli Balami and Erica Greve, founders of Gabasawa Women and Unlikely Heroes, respectively who are providing therapy to the traumatised girls who escaped and some of the parents, implored everyone to continue to work towards the rescue of the girls.

They also said the children and their parents are very distressed, hence they require some treatment for trauma.