Akeredolu orders arrest of 'fake' traditional rulers

Governor Akeredolu

Governor of Ondo State, Rotimi Akeredolu

The Governor Rotimi Akeredolu-led administration has ordered the arrest of persons parading themselves as traditional rulers in Ondo state.

This comes less than a week after two monarchs clashed over the closure of a market during the celebration of the Aheregbe festival.

Mrs. Bamidele Ademola-Olateju, the Commissioner for Information and Orientation, disclosed shortly after the weekly State Executive Council meeting.

Apart from the arrest of ‘fake’ rulers, the government also cancelled the closure of markets without official approval.

Some traditional rulers would also be upgraded to different grades. Similarly, the council approved the elevation of some chiefs to the status of Obas in the various communities.

The names and upgraded grades of the affected Monarchs will be published by the government in a white paper which will be made available to members of the public soon.

She, however, added that the issue of paramountcy is still pending and awaiting the amendment of the State’s Chieftaincy Law.

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”Some people have been parading themselves as Olofun of Irele in Irele Local Government and Olu of Igodanlisa in Okitipupa Local Government without the approval of the State Executive Council.”

“The State Executive Council has decided that such persons be arrested and investigated for their infractions against the State Chieftaincy Law.”

“Also, the State EXCO noted the permit granted for the observance of traditional festivals in the state.” The government hereby reiterates that there shall be no closure of markets without the approval of the Governor.

“Where approval is granted, such approval shall be limited to the Oba’s market alone, not shops in residential areas.

“In addition, we discussed the use of Yoruba language in communication as the government interfaces with the people and its officers.”

“At the State Executive Council, we decided that we encourage the use of Yoruba or other native languages like Ijaw, Ikale, or Ilaje, as the case may be, in our communication.”

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